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  1. A slowly dying mower deck 
    #1
    Ihave an E-16 on which I first did some reconditioning back in 2005.The mower deck has always been a pieced together, patched up, pieceof "necessity is the mother of..." reconstruction. It wasbent, then reinforced, cracked, and again reinforced, and rusty. Idid manage to halt the rust using rust converter and epoxy paint butthe mower's inter-motor alignment is wonky and the strapping used toreinforce the right side restricts grass ejection. The small-framemotors, which were beat-up looking to start with, are getting hottersooner each time I use it. I'm guessing the lower bearings or sealsare the cause.


    Mycurrent thinking involves starting over, having a local fab shop cut,bend, and weld a stainless steel deck, then add new motors along withthe old front wheels, mounts, and rear roller, and sell the oldmotors to someone better equipped to rebuild them. Does anyone knowif the large-frame motors are higher torque/horsepower? If so, I'dlike to find three that are in good shape and use them on the newdeck. I tried H. Zimmerman's site (cleanpower) contact link and havegotten no reply. Are there other sources?


    Witha currently new set of GC2 batteries, and the Alltrax controller Iinstalled several years ago, the E-16 is a pure joy to use in everyother respect!
     
     

  2. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #2
    After discovering that the fabrication shop I've used for years is going out of business, and finding out that the tall LF deck motors will cost $275 each, I've pursued two other tracks.

    One involves using the large motor on my tiller attachment (which rarely gets used) to power three blades on a Cub Cadet mower deck, powering it through the deck's right-angle drive shaft so the motor can lie horizontal above the deck.

    The other track is attempting to buy a new-looking, red (Wheel Horse?) deck with three LF motors from an E-Bay lister whose tractor, blade, and deck didn't sell.

    We'll see which pursuit works out, but does anyone see a problem with using that tiller motor on a 48", 3-blade deck? I checked the rotation of the motor and angle drive and those match up, but I can't find horsepower or RPM specs on the motor. The right angle drive is from a PTO, so I'm guessing it would like 2000 RPM. If the motor is higher I might have to use a smaller pulley on the output side of the angle drive and a shorter drive belt on the blade pulleys.
     
     

  3. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #3
    According to the motor table on the Elec Trak Wikipedia entry, the tiller motor is 2.5 HP, 66 Amps, and 3100 RPM.

    Tim M
     
     

  4. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #4
    Thanks for that! Didn't know this was on Wikipedia. If I go that route it'll take a bit of tinkering to get the drive pulley and belt length just right, but at 2.5 HP I should have plenty of oomph for a 48' to 50" deck.
     
     

  5. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #5
    Looks like my deck problem may be solved as I found an E-Bay listing that failed to sell which had an E-12 with a front blade and a red, large-motor deck in very fine condition. I contacted the seller and he was willing to sell me the deck alone for $500, shipping included. He checked the motors and they all spun up, so I may have found a solid replacement. I'll find out by Thursday when it gets here. The Cub Cadet deck would have worked with my tiller's motor but would require a shaft coupler to PTO, a smaller drive pulley, and a shorter drive belt. Is the red deck from a Wheel Horse or New Idea tractor?
     
     

  6. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #6
    Senior Member FarmallMan's Avatar
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    Glad you found a replacement. I think in the long term, that's the best solution. Certainly the most direct.

    Nick
     
     

  7. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #7
    The deck looks terrific, but it looks like I also inherited somebody else's problems.

    As you can see from the photo, the previous owner had those thin motor flanges on the short, fat motors break in 8 spots on each of the two left motors. That person put plastic sewer couplings over the motors and fastened them in two spots with bolts running down through the deck. Unfortunately, it didn't solve every problem. Sometimes those motors develop a nasty vibration. I'l try balancing the blades, but they're nearly brand new and twice as thick as any I've used before (made for brush? Never seen any like them.)

    The fix might have worked if he/she had used three bolts, but as it stands the motors vibrate in the axis running between the two current bolts. I'm thinking that replacing these with a thick metal/plastic flange, about 4.7" I.D. and 7.5" O.D., about 1/2" thick, and bolting that down in 8 spots, instead of the standard 4, might better solve the problem. Surely this has happened to other owners. What did you use?
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  8. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #8
    The blades appear to be Gator blades (aftermarket mulching blades). If so, the center/arbor bolt hole is larger than the Elec Trak 5/16 bolt.
    Then if the previous owner did not install some type of bushing to make up the difference or if the bushing doesn't have close tolerances, part of the vibration may be the blades being off center.

    Tim M
     
     

  9. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #9
    I think you're right on that. That's probably what caused the motor flanges to crack. I'll either look for bushings or try laying a bead of brass around the hole on those and redrilling to the proper size. Meanwhile, I'll try the blades from my worn out deck. Thanks!
     
     

  10. Re: A slowly dying mower deck 
    #10
    Senior Member FarmallMan's Avatar
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    Hi Bob,

    The gatorblades are known for being more demanding in terms of power requirements. For what it's worth, you can get a new set of blades from Jim C for $48. It might be worth considering.

    As far as repairing the existing rings, some people remove the broken ring and epoxy on a new one. The reinforcing rings that GE offered work well for replacing the broken flange.

    Nick
     
     

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