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  1. E8M Electrical Testing 
    #1
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    Kansas City, MO
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    I have chased down and labeled all the wires for my E8M and have removed the charging system, as I will be using a separate smart charger. My question is, how do I test the various components of the system, as shown to be sure they still work? I also don't know what to set my multi meter on to test these components properly. Any help would be great!!!


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  2. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #2
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    Delaware, USA
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    Looking at your pictures, you have a lot of corrosion to clean up. The rust is non-conductive.

    To test a switch or relay, use the Ohms setting on your multimeter and look for zero ohms on the closed contacts and switches, infinite resistance on the open ones. Your wiring diagram will show you all the values for any resistors. Diodes should conduct in one direction, and not in the other - so if they show near-zero resistance when the red probe of your meter is on the left, they should show infinite resistance when you switch probes so that the red is on the right.

    Personally, if I had the wiring harness loose on the bench like that, I'd recreate an exact duplicate using new wire and new components. It might be less work than troubleshooting the old one, it would certainly be less work than polishing off all that rust and corrosion, and in the end I'd have all shiny new wiring instead of 40 year old wiring. If do you replace everything, make sure you use the same size, color and type of wire as the original and get a set of wire number markers so you can mark them with the original numbers, that way the original service manual is still correct.

    I helped a buddy replace an original 1970 relay last week; we could have rebuilt it, but we chose to install an exact duplicate instead. That way we won't have to work on it again until 2060 or thereabouts!
     
     

  3. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #3
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    Sep 2016
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Thank you for the response, I will look into replacing, but as I have the time I might try and clean up and investigate what works. Do you know if there is anything that needs to be done to the system if I remove the charger wires from the setup? I removed wire 30 and 1041 (Circled in the pic), but feel like something needs to be on the other side of CB2??
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  4. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #4
    Senior Member FarmallMan's Avatar
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    You can clean everything up pretty well when it's on the bench like that. I've had pretty good luck cleaning the corrosion off of the wire terminals with a Dremel wire brush. The black cylinder "L" contactor is sealed, and non-serviceable. It can be tested by applying 36 volts across the small terminals, and measuring the resistance across the big terminals. The resistance should be low. The PTO contactor, to a certain extent, is serviceable because it is an open frame unit.

    It's hard to tell, but that diode assembly looks a little funky. If you test the diode, it should have near zero resistance in one direction and high resistance in the other. This testing should be done with one or both sides of the assembly disconnected from the other wiring.

    In an E8, the circuit breaker unit only serves to protect the charger circuitry from over-currents. You can wire in your new non-OEM charger through this circuit breaker, and this be a good thing to do. To do so, connect the NEGATIVE side of the charger to the stud where wire 30 used to connect. Connect the POSITIVE terminal of the charger to the connection where wire 1041 used to connect. If you opt not to wire your charger this way, then nothing would connect to the wire 30 side of the CB. Just run the lock washer and nut down tight on the terminal for possible future use. The other side of the CB serves as a junction point for wires 8048 and 8058, so the breaker really needs to remain in place.

    Nick
     
     

  5. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #5
    Senior Member FarmallMan's Avatar
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    I started my reply before your last post, so I am just seeing it now. I will have to take some time and read through it carefully. A video wouldn't hurt, if you feel so inclined.

    Nick
     
     

  6. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #6
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    Jul 2007
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    Larsen, WI
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    I had the same issue on a New Idea EGT100 I worked on over the winter. I purchased a new circuit breaker assembly from Harold at Clean Power Supply, the price was pretty reasonable I would say too.
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  7. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #7
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    How about a thermal circuit inline with wires 3 and 12? something that would be close to the thermal capacity as what is in the motor?
     
     

  8. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #8
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    I have tried those terminals both ways and get no results. I will check it later for continuity, but is there a bypass or a switch I could add to turn the motor on without having to connect it manually each time? I doubt I can remove the motor to access the internals without breaking the pulley (again). LOL
     
     

  9. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #9
    Senior Member FarmallMan's Avatar
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    The two spade terminals on the motor are connected to a thermal circuit breaker. It's purpose is to shut the motor down in the event that it overheats. It does this by interrupting the power to the L contactor. If you discover that the circuit breaker is an open circuit (no continuity) and the motor is at room temperature, then it has failed. If that's the case, you really have only two options.

    First, repair the failed component. This would restore functionality as intended, but would require removal/disassembly of the motor. This is the "best" repair, but also the most involved.

    Second, is to bypass the circuit breaker. Doing so will allow the motor to run, but without any thermal protection. It would be up to the operator to make sure he/she does not overload and overheat the drive motor. Do bypass thermal breaker, just connect the wire 3 to the two wire 12s. To do this, basically, connect the wires that would have connected to the spade terminals on the motor to each other instead. Do not connect them to anything else, other than themselves.

    Nick
     
     

  10. Re: E8M Electrical Testing 
    #10
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    Sep 2016
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    I have cleaned up all the connections and have the components RUNNING!!! BUT...there are some oddities I cannot account for, When I press down on the seat switch the blade motors engage, and nothing else. but if I engage the clutch switch before pressing the seat switch the blade motors will not engage. The PTO switch on the console does nothing. Also for the drive motor, I have to touch wire 3 to the negative side and it will run, if I have it plugged into the blade terminal where it is supposed to be, nothing happens, also the 12 wire that connects to the drive motor does nothing plugged into its correct spot. I can post a video if that would help, I have gone over the wiring diagram over and over, and cannot find an issue...I have removed the charger. Any help is appreciated!!!
     
     

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